International Law

소리재생 소리멈춤

Dokdo is also Korean Territory under International Law.

1900 - Emperor Gojong of the Korean Empire solidified Dokdo’s territorial sovereignty through the declaration of Imperial Order No. 41.

The Korean Empire solidified Dokdo’s territorial sovereignty through the declaration of Imperial Order No. 41 in the 4th year of the Gwangmu Era (1900). However, it was followed by Japan’s Shimane Prefecture Announcement No. 40 (Feb. 22, 1905) claiming Dokdo as Japanese territory. This was an act of plunder against the Korean Peninsula during the Russo-Japanese War. This was an illegal act which violated the territorial sovereignty of the Korean Empire; therefore, the claim is invalid under international law.

< Korean Empire Imperial Order No. 41 >

< Korean Empire’s Gazette No. 1716 >

1946 - General Headquarters of the Allied Powers confirmed Dokdo as Korea’s territory

The General Headquarters of the Allied Powers(GHQ) which governed Japan after its loss in World War 2 announced Supreme Commander Allied Powers Instruction Notes(SCAPIN) which excluded Dokdo from Japanese territory (SCAPIN No. 677, Jan. 29, 1946) and prohibited Japanese fishing boats from approaching within 12 nautical miles (SCAPIN No. 1033, June 22, 1946).

< SCAPIN No. 677 >

1951 – Japan acknowledged Dokdo as Korean Territory

Upon ratification of the Treaty of San Francisco in August of 1952, Japan included Dokdo as part of Korea in the Japanese Domain Reference Map which was passed by Japanese legislators. According to international law, this was evidence that the Japanese government willingly acknowledged the islets as being sovereign Korean territory. In addition, Mainichi Newspapers published an area map of Japan labelling Dokdo in the domain of Korea.

< Japanese Domain Reference Map >

< Area Map of Japan >